I layer – Define and analyze the real-life problem to choose the appropriate task sequence
3. Sequence the classes' conditions
In this step, you will decide how to sequence the conditions. The main idea is to give students a chance to train in the skill hierarchy in different conditions. Then students will be able to learn how to adjust it to various conditions and will be able to transfer what was learned further. Ideally, the sequence should start with the condition manageable for your students and finish with the condition to which you aim to prepare students. In the next step, you will create a series of simulations for each condition.
If your real-life problem is small, you can choose the easy, medium, and complex conditions based on your context complexity factors and create for each condition several problem simulations in the following steps. This sequencing is called " whole-task."

In such sequencing, students could work with the whole skill hierarchy from the beginning.
If your real-life problem is big and, thus, too complex for students to meet at the very beginning of the program, then you can make it less complex by focusing on the part of the skill hierarchy. You will need to solve part of the problem for the students and ask them to finish the rest. Simplification occurs because students do not need to apply all the skill hierarchy; instead, they analyze how someone performed the part of the skill hierarchy for them and apply only another part of the skill hierarchy. Gradually, you will do less for students so they can apply more skills by themselves. This sequencing is called "backward chaining."
Further, I describe two variants of how you can mix the context and the skill hierarchy to create conditions with different levels of complexity.
First variant — a whole-part sequence.
The first way is to choose the context complexity: easy, medium, and difficult. It will be your high-level condition. Then within each high-level condition, create the sub-conditions based on the subgroup of skills that will be the focus of training in each condition: minimal, partial, and complete use of the skill hierarchy. The key idea of this whole-part sequence is to start with training the small subgroup of skills and finish with training the complete skill hierarchy in every high-level condition (the context complexity).


In particular, in each context (easy, medium, and difficult), students go through a series of simulations in which they train:
  • A minimal amount of skills— when most of the problem is already solved for the students, they practice only with the final steps of problem-solving (a small part of the whole skill hierarchy). Noteworthy that, ideally, students should be introduced to how the first steps were made for them as a case.
  • A partial amount of skills— when part of the problem is already solved for the students, students practice only several steps of problem-solving (a bigger part of the whole skill hierarchy). Again, ideally, students should be introduced to how the first steps were made for them as a case.
  • A complete amount of skills — students practice all the steps of problem-solving (the whole skill hierarchy).
Further, you will need to create a series of problem simulations with a minimal amount of skills, a series of problem simulations with a partial amount of skills, and a series of problem simulations with a complete amount of skills for each type of context: easy, medium, and complex context.
Second variant — a part-whole sequence.
As in the previous case, you need to choose the context complexity (easy, medium, and difficult) and the subgroup of skills (minimal, partial, and complete use of the skill hierarchy). The difference with the previous variant is that your high-level condition is the subgroup of skills.

In other words, within each high-level condition (minimal, partial, and complete use of the skill hierarchy), students go through a series of problem simulations with easy, medium, and difficult contexts. In this case, the complete amount of skills are trained only at the end of the program, but still, students have the opportunity to train the whole problem and the complete skill hierarchy in an easy, medium, and difficult context.
Other variants. The previous two variants are the ideal compromises where the students do not train the whole skill hierarchy in every simulation from the early beginning of the program; Still, they have an opportunity to do it sooner or later during the program. However, in some cases, the real problem is so big that students will be overwhelmed if we ask them to solve it sooner or later during the program. In this case, you will probably need to split your problem into several subproblems. The best way will probably be to ask the practitioner whether his / her job represents a hierarchy of problems. Do not forget to strive for the ideal — to allow students to practice the hierarchy of skills, that is, to solve the whole problem as much as possible.

No matter what variant you choose, you will need to create so many simulations! That is why I suggest you start with the easiest condition. First, focus on it, and finish all four components for the first condition. You will still need it at the start of the program; then, you will gradually increase the number of conditions and simulations.
What we strive for:
1
Fidelity
Task conditions represent the smooth transition from working in a safe, simulated task environment, via task environments with increasingly higher fidelity, to real-life practice. The first class represents the easiest condition students could manage based on their initial level. The last class represents the goal condition, that is, the condition for which the program aims to prepare students. In each condition, students are faced with the whole problem.
The algorithm for 4C/ID model from my experience
1
Define and analyze the real-life problem to choose the appropriate task sequence.
2
II layer – design, develop, and prototype one task class.
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III — improve and develop the four components for one task class.
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